Toxic Soybean - suspected of being carcinogenic ...
Playing Russian roulette with biodiversity
 Genetically engineered mushrooms - safety is just a matter of belief...
Honey Bees – the new genetically engineered laboratory animals
Laboratory animals
Genetically engineered calf
Genetically engineered oilseed rape
Gene Drive - intervention in the "germline" of natural diversity
Cloned cattle entering the EU
Teosinte growing in Spain
Flies carrying deadly genes - Olive Flies - Testbiotech
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General Court of the European Union strengthens the precautionary principle

Legal revision of risks of genetically engineered soybeans is admissible in court
Wednesday, 14 March 2018

The General Court of the European Union today confirmed the right of civil society organisations to submit legal cases concerning the health risks of genetically engineered plants. The case was prompted by market authorisation being issued for the import of genetically engineered soybeans produced by US companies Monsanto and DuPont/ Pioneer which, according to analysis undertaken by Testbiotech and other experts, have not been adequately investigated for health risks.

Genome editing: Legal expert criticises opinion of Attorney General of the EuCJ

No clear distinction between breeding and genetic engineering
Wednesday, 28 February 2018

On 18 January, the Attorney General of the EU Court of Justice (EuCJ) published his position on whether or not so-called genome editing must be regulated under current EU GMO legislation. On behalf of Testbiotech, the well-known EU legal expert Professor Ludwig Kraemer has now analysed the position of the Attorney General (C-528/16). Professor Kraemer worked as an official for the EU Commission (DG Environment) until 2004 and was involved in drawing up the current EU GMO regulations.

Genetically engineered “super-muscly pigs” for the meat industry

Genetically engineered pigs could be marketed in the EU without risk assessment or labelling

19 February 2018 / New methods of genetic engineering, such as the gene scissors CRISPR/Cas, are being used to produce animals with enhanced muscle growth. These are so-called “super-muscly pigs”. Various experiments have been carried out with pigs, cattle, sheep and goats to “knock-out” the myostatin (MSTN) gene which controls muscle growth. If MSTN is disrupted, there is an abnormal proliferation of muscle cells. These experiments have been successful in some animals; and in some cases patents have been filed on the resulting pigs and cattle.